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Journaling for Creativity.

Mind training games: The ripples of existence

This weeks game is a game best played when you have time to relax and ponder.

The concept of the game is straightforward; think about or study a person, item or event, then describe it by using the effects it causes without ever mentioning it.

Nothing exists in isolation; simply by existing, an item will cause some effects in the world around it. Visualise these as if things are a rock surrounded by water and from it ripples are spreading out and away, affecting the watery world around it.

Journaling word games: Finding metaphors

This weeks word game is a very quick and simple one that can be played as a mental exercise and as a game in your creative journal.
It consists of looking for and devising simple and complex metaphors for events and items encountered during your daily life.

Mind training games: Anti-self protection

Part of the series of posts on games that can be played in a creativity journal to develop awareness and creativity.
“….This is one of the longer games you can play in your creativity journal and also one of the more serious games. A game that tricks your own self-protection system into allowing you to go where you are normally forbidden to go to…. “

Mind training games: Sensory impressions

You can also do this with the other four senses and suddenly a wealth of associated sensations are available to you. Let your mind wander far and wide whilst it fills the page. It does not matter if you jump from childhood to adult memories or skip between continents as you skip across the page. Allow your brain to dance in and out of distant and diverse memories, allow it to open up and find its own half-forgotten connections as the exercise progresses.

Journaling Brain Games for Creative Development

Ideal creativity games would have you perform mental exercises tasking both the logical and the creative minds simultaneously, but this is seldom possible. The simple reality is that most available brain exercises fall slightly either side of this perfect balance. This makes a collection of mind games necessary to both develop the all important connection and the ability to transfer ideas between your creative-mind and your logical-mind.

Why Journal? Journaling to generate ideas

This post follows on from So why journal?, in which I listed a few reasons why journaling is a sound investment of your time. Here, we further investigate the ‘Journaling to generate ideas’ section of that post, expanding the ideas and exploring their benefits in our quest of how to journal.
…Additionally, by being freed from the mindset of “having to complete a task in one sitting”, your creative thinking remains running, working away in the background, so more ideas surface whilst you go about your other tasks….

Why Journal?: Journaling for organisation

This post follows on from “So why journal?”, in which I listed a few reasons why journaling is a sound investment of your time. Here, we further investigate the ‘For organisation’ section of that post, expanding the ideas and exploring their benefits.

So why Journal?: Journaling for training

This post follows on from “So why journal?”, in which I listed a few reasons why journaling is a sound investment of your time. Here, we further investigate the ‘For training’ section of that post, expanding the ideas and exploring their benefits.

So why journal: Journaling for capturing

This post follows on from “So why journal?,” where I listed a few reasons why journaling is a sound investment of your time. Here we further investigate the ‘journaling for capturing’ section, expanding those ideas and exploring their benefits.

How to keep writing when your inner critic screams

…What happens next is that we drop into edit mode, your inner critic takes over and all the creative flow drains away whilst we correct, fiddle, adjust, rearrange, and agonise over word choice. The wonderful creativity has dried up and it can be many minutes before it again comes back on stream…
…However, there is a neat trick that I have learned, one that can fence off your inner critic and stop him/her from jumping in and destroying your creative flow. This trick revolves around two things. The first is;