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Journaling for Creativity.

Journaling games: The story in a title

This is a game dedicated to Don Murray with an acknowledgment to Will Terrell for his insights on what attracts human attention.

Don Murray proposed that writers should keep day books, otherwise known as writer’s journals or writer’s notebooks. Don, amongst other things, filled his day books with lists. One of which was a list of potential titles for future stories.

All of which is good, but as Will Terrell explains in his video, a simple change can make a title far more memorable.

Types of Entry: Recording things – Questions

Journaling for creativity is a process, and perhaps the most obvious indicator that you are involved in a process, and not producing a product, is when you record questions in your journal.

These may be questions for you to answer or questions in need of answers from someone else.

Whether they are queries on your fictional characters or contemplations about real people, the whys, hows, whats and wheres will always keep occurring, and until you know an answer what better place to keep the question current than your journal.

Journal word games: Perpetual journal prompts

This game is in two parts. The first part takes a few minutes to do, once a week and the second part is done once a day for seven days and then repeats. Once you’re into the habit of playing this game, you should never need to subscribe to a daily journaling prompt program ever again.

The game lends itself to becoming a regular 20 minute journaling slot and part of your daily routine.

Types of Entry: Recording things, Events

Mention an event to someone and they will invariably think along the lines of an organised occasion, an important incident or a sporting contest.

However, those are all big events. For us, when we are practicing journaling for creativity, events can be much smaller. For us an event is any discrete action or change that we can observe.

There are events occurring all around us, all of the time. Little events and bigger events are part of our daily life and unfortunately, unless they are BIG events, we tend to allow them to flash past; unrecognised and unrecorded.

Journaling word game; The simple complexity of oxymorons

“…Language, and its formation, is the logical-mind’s domain, whilst making sense of the paradoxes that are represented by oxymorons is our creative-mind’s speciality. In order to form these linguistic trinkets, we need to employ both parts of our minds, and in doing so, causes activity to cross the bridge (the corpus callosum) between our logical and creative minds. The increased activity across this bridge strengthens it further and develops our ability to enable cooperation between both parts of our mind…”

Personal dialogue entry: Naming your journal

One writer tweeted on the web that she referred to her journal as a friend, and that by doing so she had given it not just a name but also a character.

She stated that after naming it, she gained far more from her involvement with her journal.

Initially this may sound strange to some people; after all it is only a notebook, an inanimate object.

To some people, naming a journal will sound “twee” and “soppy”, but is it?

Personal dialogue entry: Letter to a friend

Similar to the personal dialogue entry is the ‘letter’ style of entry.

Here though, instead of attempting to have an ongoing conversation, the entry takes the form of a letter about a particular point written to another person. Normally either you or the journal.

My (thing) is special because

This week’s game is a silly little journaling for creativity game that can be surprisingly powerful in its ability to provide insights into things that would elude you when considering them in a normal manner.

It is also a fun little game and if you are competitive then it can be compulsive if played against another writer/artist.

The 24 types of journal entry when Journaling for Creativity

So far on the blog we have discussed what journaling for creativity is, and have listed the things that you may scribble, snap, click, type or place an entry into or on to. In the next section, we will be working our way through the different types of entry that may become part of your creative journal and today’s post summarises the areas we will be covering in the weeks to come.

Journaling word game: Forming recurrence in sentences

“Recurrence” is a quick game of creating sentences that contain some form of recurring sound, structure or emotion; a game that is best played in your creative journal when you have five minutes to spare.
Recurrence is often used as a blunt instrument in speeches to impart strong emotions, and this is where we are most likely to recognise it.
However, it can also be used with far more delicacy and doing so can transform prose.