Neat Newsletter

Latest news and information straight to your inbox.
No need to visit the site and search through recent posts.
Easy opt-out at any time.

Archives

Free Service

Free help for anyone
interested in improving their
Journaling for Creativity.

Mind training games: Finding physical similes

This week’s game is one of the really enjoyable, fun games that can fill any odd moment. If played in your journal by yourself, it makes for a satisfying diversion or it can be a pleasurable social game played amongst friends.
How to play. Look at your surroundings and for the items there identify other things that have similar physical characteristics.
In other words find physical similes of the original object.
Which is easy until you strech yourself into all the abstract possibilities.

Are you able to help?

My apologies. This week, instead of putting up a post, I am asking all of you for a little help; especially from anyone who uses a mobile device to read this website.

We have become aware, that on many mobile phones, this website looks….

Well, it either doesn’t display anything at all or it looks really rubbish!

NOT GOOD, NOT GOOD AT ALL!

So, after some quick and desperate measures we have found and installed some software that detects when you are viewing the site from a mobile device.
If you are viewing this on a mobile, please give us your thoughts by filling in the poll below. It should only take a few seconds, and the results will be of huge use to making the site function correctly. We have tested the new software on all the mobiles we have available, but there are so many and to test it on all of them is beyond our capabilities.

Journaling word games: Varying the focal length

Today’s game borrows a technique from the photographic arts. In this game we attempt to either draw in or distance our reader from the action, by considered use of viewpoint.

The game involves rewriting the same scene as observed from different physical perspectives, in the same way that a photographer will subtly vary a composition by adjusting the focal length when taking a photograph ….. this technique can provide the reader with a perception of being ‘up close’ or ‘viewing from a distance’ and so subtly change the effect of a scene. The technique can also be used to play with emotions, withhold information from the reader or make additional information available.

Types of Entry: Recording things, Events

Mention an event to someone and they will invariably think along the lines of an organised occasion, an important incident or a sporting contest.

However, those are all big events. For us, when we are practicing journaling for creativity, events can be much smaller. For us an event is any discrete action or change that we can observe.

There are events occurring all around us, all of the time. Little events and bigger events are part of our daily life and unfortunately, unless they are BIG events, we tend to allow them to flash past; unrecognised and unrecorded.

Journaling word games: Tension in word pairs

This week’s word game has been taken from “Writing the Natural Way” by Gabriele Lusser Rico. The game explores tension between similar word pairs and is an ideal game for a fifteen minute break in your day.

Types of Entry: Recording things, everyday things

They surround us every minute of the day.
We are all, continuously, interacting with them.
So familiar with them have we become, that they appear unimportant, unmemorable and go unnoticed.
What are they? Oh, just everyday things.
However, to the creative journaler, the everyday things surrounding people, groups or organisations become very important indicators of lives being lived.

Morning Pages and Creativity

This week we are pleased to have a guest post on the blog from the incredibly knowledgeable Mari McCarthy. Mari is the owner and force behind the website CreateWriteNow.com and there she is interested in, and writes about, all aspects of journaling. One aspect in particular is the practice of writing ‘Morning pages’, a practice that is extensively used within the artistic and creative community and this is what she is talking about in today’s post.

Types of journal entry: Observations and descriptions

One of the types of entry in a journal will be from observations and descriptions of the things you encounter. Let us just spend a while considering the differences between these two terms.

Some journal entries can be a straightforward list of observations. This list can form a scene or be no more than a collection of facts, for example;
-
“Norman Church, grey flint, white lime mortar, altar of grey sandstone, peeling paint, crazed varnish, black pews with rounded edges, delicate glass held by sagging lead, plaster patched…” –
Or the entry can be all the same facts plus the fleeting uncertain extras that occur whilst observing, the combination of which makes for an emotive description;

Journaling word game; The simple complexity of oxymorons

“…Language, and its formation, is the logical-mind’s domain, whilst making sense of the paradoxes that are represented by oxymorons is our creative-mind’s speciality. In order to form these linguistic trinkets, we need to employ both parts of our minds, and in doing so, causes activity to cross the bridge (the corpus callosum) between our logical and creative minds. The increased activity across this bridge strengthens it further and develops our ability to enable cooperation between both parts of our mind…”